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Applying Veneer over a Rounded Edge

Quick tips on applying veneer to a four-inch curve. October 19, 2013

Question
I've done basic veneer replacement on antique radio cabinets in the past, but am now trying more advanced stuff. I have several small cabinets with rounded corners, and I'm having challenges getting the veneer bent properly, then problems clamping to get glue adhesion and avoid bubbles. I tried the top on the cabinet shown and had to start over, as I hadn't clamped the rounded part properly. I was using paper-backed mahogany and TiteBond glue as well as Vac-u-clamp veneer softener. I don't have a vacuum press. I would appreciate any recommendations.


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Forum Responses
(Veneer Forum)
From contributor J:
You need to get some hide glue and a veneer hammer, and practice on scrap. Forget the paper backed stuff too. It will take some work, but you'll get it.



From contributor T:
Get some PSA backed veneer, and just rub it down. It will easily conform to that radius.


From contributor F:
Haven't done any sheets that large, but I normally pre-form (bend) the veneer over torch-heated pipe. Have bent some over wood forms with a clothes iron. Makes the hammered hide glue process easier as you don't have to fight the spring-back.
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