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Basic lumber grades

An overview of NHLA grades. October 15, 2001

Question
Can anyone explain to me what the four basic NHLA grades are for hardwood?

Forum Responses
Take a look at this article, Understanding Hardwood Lumber Grading



See the NHLA website. They have a nice picture guide.

The best grade is FAS and it must be 83% clear or clearer on the poorest side. Clearness is measured in large rectangular areas called cuttings.

The next grade is No. 1 Common, which must be 67% clear on the poor side, etc.

Next is No. 2 Common, which is 50% clear. Then No3A Common, which is 33% clear. Then No. 3B, which is 25% sound.

There is also a grade called Select (which includes another popular grade called FAS 1-Face). Selects are FAS on the good side and No. 1 Common on the poor side.

There are many other restrictions, including number of cuttings, size of cuttings, and size of lumber.

Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor

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