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Carob Wood

This short thread is worth a glance just for the photo of sawn Carob logs. January 25, 2010

Question
I was given several carob logs. I sent them to a sawyer and received the flitches, boards and cants back. This is the most beautifully grained wood I have ever seen. I have about 500 BD FT in 4/4, 8/4, 12/4, and 16/4.

Have others worked with this wood as lumber or as a turning medium? What is the specific density? I notice Overholtzer turns both the heartwood and the sapwood. Is the sapwood stable?


Click here for higher quality, full size image

Forum Responses
(Sawing and Drying Forum)
From contributor G:
I really love this wood and would love to get some. I use it for marquetry and have found it to work beautifully. Its orange red color is stable. Hard to find. It looks to be a great log.

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