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Characteristics of butt log lumber

Denser, darker wood than the rest of that from the same laod may be from butt logs. 1998.

by Professor Gene Wengert

Q.
I dry red oak in a kiln using an Ebac dryer. It is about a 1000 bd.ft. kiln with enough air flow to maintain 110 degrees. The problem I am having is this: several boards, when they are planed, seem to be darker and harder than the rest (10 %). Is this just in the wood itself or is there a problem?

A.
I suspect that you have some lumber from a butt log that is much denser than normal, but this is just a guess. We do find that butt logs have darker color too. It is not a kiln problem.

Professor Gene Wengert is Extension Specialist in Wood Processing at the Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Click on Wood Doctor Archives to peruse past answers.

If you would like to obtain a copy of "The Wood Doctor's Rx", visit the Wood Education and Resource Center Web site for more information.

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