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Cracking Concerns with Veneer Over Solid Wood

Veneer should be able to accomodate the movement of the substrate if the species are similar. January 25, 2010

Question
I'm building for four large cabinets, with ten frame and panel doors. The frames are 4" wide by 1" thick, hard maple, with the front and back of the frames veneered with English sycamore. I have experience veneering plywood but not as a facing over solid wood. Is it likely that any solid wood movement would crack the veneer? The grain of both will be in the same direction. I was planning to use Titebond III glue. Should I switch to Titebond II for because its lighter in color? Please advise, I抦 a bit nervous here. Mistakes can be so costly.

Forum Responses
(Veneer Forum)
From contributor S:
If the substrait has a similar expansion and contraction rate as the veneer species you should not have any problems. Either glue type will work fine.



From the original questioner:
It is probably a safe assumption that hard maple and English sycamore (European maple) will expand and contract similarly. If I glue the veneer on each side, at different times, would that cup a 1" thick frame of hard maple?


From contributor S:
As long as you veneer both sides it should not cup. The only reason it may move (cup a little) is if the maple is not dried properly or has stability issues. If time is available I like to do several millings with a day or so in between till I reach my final dimensions. It gives the material time to relax and helps to remove some stress. I don抰 always have the time for this due to deadlines and have had not had any problems in the past.

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