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Drying hardwood lumber

Drying Hardwood Lumber focuses on common methods for drying lumber of different thickness, with minimal drying defects, for high quality applications. This manual also includes predrying treatments that, when part of an overall quality-oriented drying system, reduce defects and improve drying quality, especially of oak lumber. Special attention is given to drying white wood, such as hard maple and ash, without sticker shadow or other discoloration. Several special drying methods, such as solar drying, are described, and proper techniques for storing dried lumber are discussed. Suggestions are provided for ways to economize on drying costs by reducing drying time and energy demands when feasible. Each chapter is accompanied by a list of references. Some references are cited in the chapter; others are listed as additional sources of information.
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Drying hardwood lumber   ( )

Drying Hardwood Lumber focuses on common methods for drying lumber of different thickness, with minimal drying defects, for high quality applications. This manual also includes predrying treatments that, when part of an overall quality-oriented drying system, reduce defects and improve drying quality, especially of oak lumber. Special attention is given to drying white wood, such as hard maple and ash, without sticker shadow or other discoloration. Several special drying methods, such as solar drying, are described, and proper techniques for storing dried lumber are discussed. Suggestions are provided for ways to economize on drying costs by reducing drying time and energy demands when feasible. Each chapter is accompanied by a list of references. Some references are cited in the chapter; others are listed as additional sources of information.

Author: Denig, Joseph.; Wengert, Eugene M.; Simpson, William T.


Source: (General technical report FPL ; GTR-118):iv, 138 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Citation: Denig, Joseph.; Wengert, Eugene M.; Simpson, William T.  .  Drying hardwood lumber   (General technical report FPL ; GTR-118):iv, 138 p. : ill. ; 28 cm..
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