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Glasses, Beards, and Breathing Protection

A half-mask or helmet and hood respirator is the way to go if you can't get a good seal from a regular mask. August 21, 2006

Question
I can't seem to find a full face respirator for use with finishing vapors that will seal around the ear piece on a pair of glasses. Help!

Forum Responses
(Dust Collection and Safety Equipment Forum)
From contributor D:
I believe you only have two choices: put prescription lenses in the mask or go to coastalsafety.net and look at 3M's half face mask that allows you to wear glasses.



From contributor C:
More than two choices, actually. Aside from getting prescription lens inserts for your mask or getting a half mask, you could get a hood or helmet type respirator. They are fairly pricey compared to an APR, but a PAPR or SAR with hood or helmet is the way to go for those of us who can't achieve a proper face to mask seal due to glasses, beards, or whatever else may come into play. A positive pressure hood or helmet also has the added benefit of removing the requirement for an annual fit test.

I wear glasses and have a beard, so a standard APR won't work. I use 3M's GVP PAPR system with a L901 helmet and after having used it for a year now, would never go back to a tight fitting mask, even if the glasses and beard weren't an issue.

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