<acronym id="a2sgq"></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><center id="a2sgq"></center></acronym><acronym id="a2sgq"><center id="a2sgq"></center></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"></acronym><rt id="a2sgq"></rt>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><small id="a2sgq"></small></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><small id="a2sgq"></small></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><small id="a2sgq"></small></acronym>

Heat resistant veneer glue

There are glues that will withstand the high temperatures in heat-assisted finishing operations. 1998.

by Professor Gene Wengert

Q.
I'm looking for some glue to apply a veneer face to a curved plywood panel on a reception station. This glue will need to withstand temperatures of 150 degrees three times at 20 minutes when this unit goes through my finishing process.

We use a finish material that needs to be heat cured in sealer and topcoat. We've had trouble with glues pulling loose at this temperature.

A.
You have discovered the weak point of the common white glues and similar products. The best glue for this purpose would be a film adhesive that needs heat to cure but then once cooled will not soften with additional heat.

If this is not possible in your operation, then let's look at a cross-linking adhesive--melamine would be a good choice, urea a second choice. Contact an adhesive salesperson rather than just a store that sells glue for the best formulation.

Professor Gene Wengert is Extension Specialist in Wood Processing at the Department of Forestry, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Click on Wood Doctor Archives to peruse past answers.

If you would like to obtain a copy of "The Wood Doctor's Rx", visit the Wood Education and Resource Center Web site for more information.

人妻少妇精品视频一区