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Identifying Pignut Hickory

Forum members identify Pignut Hickory by looking at photos of the leaves, stems, and bark. November 28, 2014

Question (WOODWEB Member) :
Could someone identify exactly what type tree this is?


Click here for higher quality, full size image


Click here for higher quality, full size image

Forum Responses
(Sawing and Drying Forum)
From contributor Z:
It appears to be one of the hickories, not sure which one. If the branches are opposite then it is an ash. I did not see opposite branching pattern though. The bark favors hickory and not ash.



From contributor R:
I say hickory.


From contributor X:

I agree with hickory although not 100% positive which one. We can rule out shagbark obviously. I believe we can rule out the pecans also. I also believe based on the number of leaves and subtle shape differences between the leaves of the hickories that we can rule out mockernut, bitternut, and shellbark. This leaves us with pignut, and the shape and number of leaves in your images fits pignut almost like a glove. Also the remnants of fruit shells I see fit as well. I am 95% it is pignut hickory.


From contributor S:
I vote pignut hickory.

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