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Low-Tech Cyclone Trash Can

Tips on building a simple cyclone dust collector for a shop vacuum, on the cheap. January 23, 2012

Question
Can anyone recommend a brand of Cyclone trash can covers that they have used and liked? I'd like to buy two, and have seen several negative ratings on a couple that I checked out online.

Forum Responses
(Dust Collection and Safety Equipment Forum)
From contributor H:
Get a 55 gallon drum instead. Put a pvc straight pipe through the lid near the edge, and put a 90 degree elbow in the barrel, pointing on the tangent. This is the inlet. Drill a hole in the center, put a pvc pipe through it, and this is the outlet. Seal up the joints with duct tape. I got my barrel from a highway line painting company. Total cost: zero.

I have one of these in the shop that goes to a shop vac, which is outdoors. It's great for collecting sanding dust, floor vacuuming dust, and dust from the top of the table saw blade. The point of the barrel is to keep the dust out of the shop vac, so I can go a month without emptying it. The shop vac has a flannel sheet wrapped around the filter, so I don't have to replace the $12. filter cartridge more than once a year.



From contributor M:
I bought the one Woodcraft offers and it works great. After moving around a 35 gallon garbage can with shavings I wouldn't want to move around a 55 gallon steel drum.

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