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Machine grading of lumber : practical concerns for lumber producers

Machine lumber grading has been applied in commercial operations in North America since 1963, and research has shown that machine grading can improve the efficient use of wood. However, industry has been reluctant to apply research findings without clear evidence that the change from visual to machine grading will be a profitable one. For instance, mill managers need guidelines on machine grading. This report seeks to document such guidelines so that lumber mills can determine the feasibility of machine grading for their products. The first part of this report discusses the principles of using machine grading to assign properties. In the second part, the methods of machine-graded lumber yield assessment are described by an industry specialist. The final part discusses mill mechanical analysis and cost analysis. 2000
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Machine grading of lumber : practical concerns for lumber producers   (2000)

Machine lumber grading has been applied in commercial operations in North America since 1963, and research has shown that machine grading can improve the efficient use of wood. However, industry has been reluctant to apply research findings without clear evidence that the change from visual to machine grading will be a profitable one. For instance, mill managers need guidelines on machine grading. This report seeks to document such guidelines so that lumber mills can determine the feasibility of machine grading for their products. The first part of this report discusses the principles of using machine grading to assign properties. In the second part, the methods of machine-graded lumber yield assessment are described by an industry specialist. The final part discusses mill mechanical analysis and cost analysis.

Author: Galligan, William L.; McDonald, Kent A.


Source: (General technical report FPL ; GTR-7):39 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Citation: Galligan, William L.; McDonald, Kent A.  2000.  Machine grading of lumber : practical concerns for lumber producers   (General technical report FPL ; GTR-7):39 p. : ill. ; 28 cm..
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