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Making Veneered Panels with Sawn Lumber Cores

Here's a quick description of how to lay up panels with a core of sawn lumber and a veneer face. June 30, 2014

Question (WOODWEB Member) :
Can anyone suggest a book or article that covers veneering over lumber core? I would like to know the core strip size limits and layout rules.

Forum Responses
(Veneer Forum)
From Contributor K:
When you say veneering over lumber core are you referring to plywood sheeting or doors?



From the original questioner:
I want to saw my own veneer and glue to make up lumber core substrate for use in furniture making.


From Contributor C:
We make a lot of lumber core panels on a custom basis. Use basswood or aspen core, the drier the better (no, you can't use poplar). We gang rip to 2" and 1" strips. Glue the core flat. Calibrate with a 36 or 40 grit sanding belt. Cross band with 1/20" poplar (at 90 degrees). For best results, calibrate with 80 grit after hot pressing the cross band to the core. Finally, hot press with the face and back veneer. Use a good amount of pressure. The result is a light, strong and stable panel.

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