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Minimum Corner Radius for Laminate Edges

How tight can you bend it? Depends on the grade of laminate. Here are some tips for a tighter bend. April 20, 2011

Question
I'm building a countertop for a bar with square edges. What is the minimum radius on 90 degree and 45 degree outside and inside corners so that the laminate will bend around them and stay affixed?

Forum Responses
(Laminate and Solid Surfacing Forum)
From contributor G:
Really kind of depends on grade of laminate. My boss got me some Pionite today that is standard grade. Anything less than 3" and it gets to be quite a chore. He wants me to bend it around a two inch radius. Possible, but in no way fun/easy. I remember getting down to an inch inside radius a very long time ago, but that was a one-time thing and I wouldn't want to do it again.



From contributor B:
You can sand the back side of the laminate down pretty thin and that will help you bend a tighter radius. You can also heat the laminate with a heat gun as you bend it around the radius and that will help keep it from cracking and you can get down pretty tight. Postforming grade bends easier.
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