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Mist-type dust collection

Water-mist dust collection techniques for capturing ultra-fine dust. June 14, 2000

Q.
We manufacture doors from Western red cedar. Airborne dust is a chronic problem even though we have a good dust collection system.

I've heard about using an atomized water mist that allows the micro-wood particles to adhere to water, then fall to the floor. Anybody know anything about this, or other good technologies?



My experience with mist systems ended when I found that it took so much water mist to effectively take care of the dust that my shop became over humidified and my tools suffered with uncontrollable rust.

I haven't given up on water to filter dust, however. I'm working on a system that uses water running over a sheet of stainless steel expanded metal with a high volume, low velocity fan behind it, to draw the air through the expanded metal with a recirculation pump, and a filter to strain out the sludge.

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