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Performance of wood in a do-it-yourself solar collector

Six variations of a do-it-yourself solar collector design were constructed and exposed under stagnation conditions for 1 year; collectors were basically closed boxes without air circulation. Temperature in each collector was recorded throughout the test period and the effect of these temperatures on the wood framing and plywood in the collectors was estimated based on previous studies of effect of high temperature on properties of wood. Visual observations were also made on the wood, paint, insulation, and glazing. Temperatures in the collectors could reduce strength properties of the wood if stagnation conditions were maintained for many years. The maximum stagnation temperatures could result in spontaneous ignition of wood if maintained continuously for long time periods (months, years). Operating temperatures are usually much lower than stagnation temperatures.
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Performance of wood in a do-it-yourself solar collector   ( )

Six variations of a do-it-yourself solar collector design were constructed and exposed under stagnation conditions for 1 year; collectors were basically closed boxes without air circulation. Temperature in each collector was recorded throughout the test period and the effect of these temperatures on the wood framing and plywood in the collectors was estimated based on previous studies of effect of high temperature on properties of wood. Visual observations were also made on the wood, paint, insulation, and glazing. Temperatures in the collectors could reduce strength properties of the wood if stagnation conditions were maintained for many years. The maximum stagnation temperatures could result in spontaneous ignition of wood if maintained continuously for long time periods (months, years). Operating temperatures are usually much lower than stagnation temperatures.

Author: Sherwood, G. E.; Gatz, W. A.


Source: (Research note FPL ; 0240):6 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.

Citation: Sherwood, G. E.; Gatz, W. A.  .  Performance of wood in a do-it-yourself solar collector   (Research note FPL ; 0240):6 p. : ill. ; 27 cm..
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