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Pocket guide to Christmas tree diseases

Each year more than 30 million American families bring a live Christmas tree into their homes to become the warm and glowing center of their Christmas celebration. Years ago, most Christmas trees were cut wild. But, as demand increased and the supply of suitable wild trees decreased, growing Christmas trees in plantations became more and more common. 1989
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Pocket guide to Christmas tree diseases   (1989)

Each year more than 30 million American families bring a live Christmas tree into their homes to become the warm and glowing center of their Christmas celebration. Years ago, most Christmas trees were cut wild. But, as demand increased and the supply of suitable wild trees decreased, growing Christmas trees in plantations became more and more common.

Author: Nicholls, Thomas H.; Wray, Robert D.


Source: Pocket Guide to Christmas Trees. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station

Citation: Nicholls, Thomas H.; Wray, Robert D.  1989.  Pocket guide to Christmas tree diseases  Pocket Guide to Christmas Trees. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station.
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