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Pulling Out Dings and Dents

Tips for fixing the damage when the plumber, electrician or some other trade dents a new cabinet. October 22, 2005

Question
I dropped a tape measure on a cabinet base unit and put a dent in the floor (after it was finished). I抦 wondering if anybody knows a way to pull this out? Any help is appreciated.

Forum Responses
(Cabinetmaking Forum)
From contributor F:
I抦 not sure how large it is, but if you tried to steam it out, you would probably ruin the finish. I would use a matching burn-in stick, or wax fill stick.



From contributor C:
On a finished piece, I press the tip of a utility knife blade just through the finish a couple of times. I then put on a couple of drops of water to swell it back up. With a little color putty, you usually cannot notice it.


From contributor J:
I agree with Contributor F. It depends on how deep it is. I've never steamed, I just fill with water several times.


From contributor P:
I cover the floor when I'm installing cabinets with 1/2" beaverboard which is a lightweight, coarse fiber.

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