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Uses for Hackberry Wood

don't toss those hackberry logs. February 14, 2006

Question
Has anyone had much experience with milling and using hackberry? I cut one log a year ago and it came out nice, but I don't know if it has any real value on the market. I now have possible access to several more logs, and just wonder if they are worth cutting. Does anyone have any thoughts?

Forum Responses
(Sawing and Drying Forum)
From contributor B:
It is a good strong hardwood - used a lot in furniture manufacturing (structures inside couches and etc that are not easily seen). I have also seen some beautiful turnings from it. It also spalts well. Make sure to mill it soon after felling the tree and dry it quickly to keep the color.



From contributor H:
Hackberry is one of the most, if not the most bendable wood there is. We have made curved stairs from it, cabinets, moulding and etc. It is pretty much interchangeable with ash for jobs that require staining.


From Gene Wengert, forum technical advisor:
It is a very good wood. Sometimes it is called "Poor Man's oak."

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