<acronym id="a2sgq"></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><center id="a2sgq"></center></acronym><acronym id="a2sgq"><center id="a2sgq"></center></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"></acronym><rt id="a2sgq"></rt>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><small id="a2sgq"></small></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><small id="a2sgq"></small></acronym>
<acronym id="a2sgq"><small id="a2sgq"></small></acronym>

Veneering a Hollow Column

A vacuum bag can be arranged to apply pressure to a cylinder from inside as well as outside. September 17, 2012

Question
I need to veneer an 18" prefabricated hollow column (5/16" thick walls). I'd rather not use contact cement or go the labor intensive route of hammer veneering. I'm looking for alternative methods of gluing veneer to the column. Any suggestions are welcome.

Forum Responses
(Veneer Forum)
From contributor P:
It can be done in a vacuum bag in 2 passes. You can use an air bladder inside the cylinder so it doesn't collapse, or you can add 3/4" circular plywood ribs every 5" or so to reinforce the form. Drill a hole through each rib to allow air to flow.



From contributor J:
You don't have to use an envelope bag, and worry about crushing the column. You can bag the inside of the column and tacky tape to the outside of the column with another bag and vacuum to itself.


From contributor E:
You can veneer the piece in a vacuum bag where the bag will press on both the inside and outside of the curve. Equal pressure on both sides will not deform the piece.


From contributor C:
Have you thought about applying the veneer to 1/16 MDF? This part hurts, but I have successfully done this without failure in our fine Florida humidity. Use a high quality contact adhesive for the main field and apply Titebond II or other brand wood glue at least two inches in either direction of the seam.
人妻少妇精品视频一区