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Whether to Locate a Laminate Seam at the Kitchen Sink

Putting the seam in a long countertop at the sink location is a common practice. Here are tips. June 12, 2014

Question (WOODWEB Member) :
I have a U-shaped countertop to install. The kitchen sink is in the middle of the longest section - just over 12' long (with 45 degree mitres each end). I am using Formica. AMWAC indicates the seam should be 6" away from kitchen sink. What is best way to position the seams in this countertop? Directly under the kitchen sink seems a no-no. Any advice would be appreciated.

Forum Responses
(Laminate and Solid Surfacing Forum)
From contributor W:
I have put the seam in the sink for 30 plus years on hundreds of countertops, and to this day anytime I have a seam where I can put in the sink and not have one any other place that抯 where it will be!



From contributor Z:
Formica comes in lengths just over 12 feet so what抯 the problem? Why any seam at all? I agree with Contributor W. I too have put many a seam in the sink with no problem. A good glue job and a good seam means no problems.


From Contributor T:
I always place the seam in the sink area too, with no problems. This way, the seam is mostly cut out for the sink, leaving only the parts in front and back to show the line. I prefer leaving only a couple inches of seam exposed, as opposed to a 25" line in the middle of a work area.


From contributor J:
If the top is just over 12' we would seam a small piece in with the 45 degree miter. That way it is farther away from the sink and it is a small seam.


From contributor M:
You are correct to be a little concerned about seams at a sink. I have used five minute epoxy at sink seams for many years. It sets quickly (clamped to get a perfect flat seam) and holds the joint from opening up from long term expansion/contraction. I also will use epoxy on rounded corners to keep lam from pulling away. It抯 a bit more time consuming but provides long term durability. Note: Pull clamps and clean glue squeeze-out with lacquer thinner after one-two minutes then re-clamp for another few minutes.

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